A. PLANNING

a. Time Line- either purchased or made. I believe in having students learn the major events of the
century first, and then filling in the details as they get older. This helps create a chronological
perspective; historical events do NOT happen in a vacuum, but usually result from events that happen
before.  You might consider having the child fill in events such as the Louisiana Purchase (1803);
Louis & Clark; War of 1812; Mexican-American War; Civil War; and the Spanish-American War.

b. Acquire a folder, folders or binder(s) if you wish to begin to create a
lap-book or binder for this
unit study.

c) Print out an appropriate
Coloring Sheet, if available, for younger students

d)
Queen Victoria Research: Older Students: Research Queen Victoria and be ready to tell some
facts about her life. They can report orally or in writing, or create a Powerpoint Presentation.



B. VOCABULARY - Have students write and define these words.

century                               decade                        millineum

culture                                primary sources                secondary sources          
                                               

Older students also need to know:

B.C. (Before Christ)           
A.D. (Anno Domini- Year of Our Lord)





C. READINGS Click HERE





D. DISCUSSION  (Choose according to the children’s ages.)


1.Time Periods

What is a century?  

What is a decade?  

Why is the 19th century technically from 1801 to 1900?   
(Explain to students how our modern calendar started with the year “1 A.D.” and the “1st century” was from “1
to 100” A.D.;  The 2nd century was from 101 to 200 A.D.,  and so forth. The 19th century is from 1801 to 1900.


2) You may hear the term
“Victorian” used for the 19th century. Victoria became Queen of England in 1838 at
the age of eighteen.  She and her husband Prince Albert had 9 children, and she reigned until her death in
1901.
I.  INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF HISTORY
This information is primarily of importance to older students; the older the student, the more valuable this information will
be.

For younger children, you may wish to skip this section, cover it in a few minutes,  or incorporate the information with the
other topics.